Our latest events and news

A Seminar on "Our Ears Seem to Detect "Optimal Features from Natural Sounds ! Optimality Principles of Auditory Neural Code" (Refreshment Provided) 

Date: 01/05/2013, Time: 1-2 pm

Location: Room 952 (Foundation Sky Room), Building J03, School of Electrical and Information Engineering, University of Sydney. 

Speaker: Farzaneh Ahmadi, Post-doctoral Fellow, CARLAB, Schoolf of EIE, University of Sydney es, Sydney, Australia.

Date: 1/5/2013, Time: 1-2 pm, Location: Foundation Sky Room (952), J03, School of EIE, University of Sydney.

Speaker: Farzaneh Ahmadi

Abstract: The auditory system encodes sound by decomposing the sound signal arriving at the ear into multiple frequency bands in the cochlear. The output of each frequency band is then coded by the auditory neurons and is transferred to the brain. This auditory neural code must serve a wide range of auditory tasks that require great sensitivity in time and frequency and be effective over the diverse array of sounds present in natural acoustic environments. It has been suggested that auditory systems might have evolved highly efficient coding strategies to maximize the information conveyed to the brain while minimizing the required energy and neural resources. For natural sounds, the complete acoustic waveform at the output of the cochlear can be represented efficiently with a nonlinear model based on spike codes of the auditory nerve. In this model, idealized spikes can encode the precise acoustic features. To reach this idealised spikes, the features of the  spike code are optimized for coding either natural sounds or speech using an iterative algorithm. Surprisingly, these optimised spikes show striking similarities to time-domain cochlear filter estimates, and yield significantly greater coding efficiency than conventional signal representations. These results indicate that the auditory code might approach an information theoretic optimum and that the acoustic structure of speech might be adapted to the coding capacity of the mammalian auditory system.

Brief Biography of the Speaker: Farzaneh Ahmadi is a postdoctoral fellow at CARLab, School of Electrical Engineering. She is currently working on the question of how is our larynx controlled by neural signals. She is going to use these neural signals to develop an artificial larynx for patients who have lost their larynx functionality. Farzaneh has got her PhD from Nanyang Technological University of Singapore where she has successfully implemented a novel technology called Bionic Voice from basic idea to successful proof of concept and ready to be-commercialised. Her areas of interest are Bio-Signals processing, Computational Neuroscience, Brain Dynamics and Bionic Systems (ear/eye/voice).


IEEE Limited Offer*
Deadline for submission is 4:00pm on the 31stof March 2013
If you are a 3rd, 4th or a post-grad student in 2013**
The IEEE NSW Section will sponsor your student membership fee !
 
Instructions :
1. Go to www.ieee.org/join and register as Student Member.
2. Type in all your details. On the check-out process, press
‘Print & Mail/Fax order’ instead of ‘Proceed to checkout’. From the browser menu, print to PDF.
 
Ensure your postal address and contact details will be valid for the next 12 months or more. Instead of sending the form to IEEE HQ USA, please forward a PDF copy of this application ( Name of the File: your name-IEEE NSW student membership offer.pdf) and a copy or your current student card (Name of the File: your name.pdf) to:   Dr Ali Hellany ------IEEE NSW Student Activities Chair
                                                                University of Western Sydney, School of Engineering
                                                                Locked Bag, 1797 Penrith South DC
                                                                NSW 1797, Australia
                                                                e-mail: a.hellany@uws.edu.au
 
* The number of free student memberships is limited and will be awarded on a first come first serve basis.This offer excludes membership to individual IEEE societies which may be purchased separately. This offer is available only to students located in New South Wales. The free student membership offer covers the first year of membership only. Offer not available to current IEEE student members.
** Please attach a copy or your current student card.

Seminar on Computational Methods for the Prediction of Biomolecular Interactions and Drug Resistance

Date: 26/03/2013, Time: 1-2 pm, Location: Room 261, Building J03, School of Electrical and Information Engineering, University of Sydney.

Speaker: Professor Hong Yan, Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Abstract: In biological systems, proteins are extremely “intelligent”. They can interact with other molecules and carry out sophisticated molecular recognition tasks, which no existing computer based pattern recognition methods can match. In this talk, I’ll discuss how pattern consistency and compatibility measures can be used to understand and analyze biomolecular interactions. I’ll present a 3D pattern matching technique for identifying potential hydrogen bonds from all possible donor and acceptor atoms in two biomolecules. In this algorithm, compatibility measures developed in pattern recognition are used to formulate cooperativity in biological systems mathematically. Our method is able to pair a large number of donors and acceptors in multiple hydrogen bonds simultaneously. This method has been applied to protein-protein and protein-ligand docking with good results. Our pattern matching based algorithms have also been used successfully for drug resistance prediction. We can determine whether a drug can still be effective for a protein mutant. Our experiment results on cancer drugs correlate well with clinical data. 

Brief Biography of the Speaker: Hong Yan received his PhD degree from Yale University. He was Professor of Imaging Science at the University of Sydney and is currently Professor of Computer Engineering at City University of Hong Kong. His research interests include image processing, pattern recognition and bioinformatics, and he has over 300 journal and conference publications in these areas. Professor Yan was elected an IAPR fellow for contributions to document image analysis and an IEEE fellow for contributions to image recognition techniques and applications.

Seminar on Participatory Sensing: Crowdsourcing Data from Mobile Smarphones in Urban Spaces 

Date: 25/03/2013, Time: 1-2 pm, Location: Room 261, Building J03, School of Electrical and Information Engineering, University of Sydney.

Speaker: Associate Professor Salil Kanhere, School of Computer Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract: The recent wave of sensor-rich, Internet-enabled, smart mobile devices has opened the door for a novel paradigm for monitoring the urban landscape known as participatory sensing. Using this paradigm, ordinary citizens can collect multi-modal data streams (e.g., audio, video, sound, location coordinates, etc) from the surrounding environment using their mobile devices and share the same using existing communication infrastructure (e.g., 3G service or Wi-Fi access points). The data contributed from multiple participants can be combined to build a spatiotemporal view of the phenomenon of interest and also to extract important community statistics. Given the ubiquity of mobile phones and the high density of people in metropolitan areas, participatory sensing can achieve an unprecedented level of coverage in both space and time for observing events of interest in urban spaces. Several exciting participatory sensing applications have emerged in recent years. For example, GPS traces uploaded by drivers and passengers can be used to generate real-time traffic statistics. Similarly, street-level audio samples collected by pedestrians can be aggregated to create a citywide noise map. In this talk, we will provide a comprehensive overview of this new and exciting paradigm and outline the major research challenges.

Brief Biography of the Speaker: Salil obtained a B.E. in Electrical Engineering from VJTI, Bombay, India in 1998 and received his M.S. and Ph.D., both in Electrical Engineering from Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA in 2001 and 2003 respectively. Salil is currently an Associate Professor with the School of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. His current research interests are in the areas of pervasive computing, sensor networks, participatory sensing, mobile networking and security/privacy. He has published over 90 peer-reviewed manuscripts and delivered several tutorial seminars on these topics. Salil is an associate editor for the Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies, the International Journal of Ad Hoc and Ubiquitous Computing and the ICST Transactions on Ubiquitous Environments. He has served on the Organizing Committee and Program Committee of numerous IEEE and ACM conferences. Salil is a Senior Member of both the IEEE and ACM.

The University of Sydney O-Week
Time: February 27th, 2013 
Venue: Lawn outside Old Engineering Library, Next to the PNR building, Darlington Campus 
The biggest orientation festival in Australia. 
Know more about IEEE and the University of Sydney IEEE student branch 
Find out about talks and events,decide which events to attend
Register Online , find out how you can get Free membership 
We are waiting for you at Lawn outside Old Engineering Library, Next to the PNR building, Darlington Campus February 27th, 2013
Industry Tours
TransGrid’s Sydney West Substation Tour, Eastern Creek
Overview: TransGrid is the owner operator of the High Voltage transmission network in NSW – connecting major generation sources in NSW and also to the Queensland and Victorian networks. Sydney West substation is one of the 91 substations TransGrid are responsible for operating and maintaining and includes five 330/132kV transformers, 330kV/132kV switchgear, a Static Var Compensator (SVC) as well as state of the art protection, metering, communications and control equipment. We are encouraging all electrical engineering students to attend this one-off event. Opportunities to visit transmission level substations are very rare and the experience gained could be invaluable to your future professional development as an engineer and any future graduate/vacation work applications. Places are limited so secure your place by registering today
Time: Tuesday 6th November 2012, 1:00pm – 5:00 pm
Venue: Sydney West Substation, Eastern Creek – A bus will leave campus at 1:00pm
Contact: David Browne
Cost: Free for IEEE members, $10 for non-members
RSVP: Friday 28th October 2012 (Email David) (download form here)
Seminar
Speaker: Professor Iain Collings (Research Director, CSIRO ICT Centre)
Title: Generating Impact from Research in Wireless Technologies
Time: 10th of October 2012, 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Venue: Lecture Theatre 123, School of IT, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006
Abstract: This talk will focus on some key aspects of generating impact from fundamental research. Examples will be given of recent activities at CSIRO where ground breaking research has led to new practical systems and industrial uptake. Particular systems include wireless position location technologies, wide-band steerable antenna arrays, wireless sensor network systems, and rural broadband communication technologies.
Speaker Biography: Iain was born in Melbourne, Australia, in 1970. He received the B.E. degree with first class honours in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from the University of Melbourne in 1992, and the Ph.D. degree in Systems Engineering from the Australian National University in 1995. Prior to his current position as Research Director and OCE Science Leader of the Wireless and Networking Technologies Laboratory at the CSIRO ICT Centre, Iain was an Associate Professor at the University of Sydney (1999-Aug 2005), a Lecturer at the University of Melbourne (1996-1999), and a Research Fellow in the Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Sensor Signal and Information Processing (1995).
ANNUAL STUDENT RESEARCH CONFERENCE 4TH Annual Student Research Conference
Engineering and IT solutions to meet global challenges
Time: 24 September 2012
Venue: PNR Lecture Theatre
All engineering, project management and IT postgraduate students, academics and final year undergraduates are invited to join the large body of research students at this faculty event to network and communicate our research success. With over $4500 in prize money, the event will include presentations from 3rd and 4th year research students, a keynote speaker, an interactive panel session and a poster display. The theme of this year's conference is 'Engineering and IT solutions to meet global challenges'.

IEEE NSW Section sponsors the best paper presenter from both schools of Electrical and Information Engineering (EIE) and Information Technology (IT).
Seminar in August to promote the Australia’s Engineering Week
Speaker: Dr. Ehssan Sakhaee
Title: The Secrets of Innovative Mind
Time: 6:00pm-7:00pm, Wednesday, 8th of August, 2012
Venue: Farrell Lecture Theatre, Level 3, Peter Nicol Russell J02, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 [..link to map]
Abstract: Innovation is key to advancing in today’s fast pace-society in every domain imaginable, most notably technology. It allows individuals and teams creatively solve new and emerging problems effectively and efficiently. From Einstein and Gandhi to Steve Jobs, throughout history we see great thinkers who utilized their innovative, creative minds to change the world. If you closely study these great thinkers, you will understand that their achievement was due to learnable skills and traits, and mindsets that are inherent in all of us, often dormant due to our beliefs about ourselves and our environment. In this talk we explore how the creative mind works, by exploring great historical thinkers and their traits and how to “own these traits”. This talk explores how to extract solutions amongst chaos, applicable to everything one does and experiences, from smallest challenges you face on a daily basis, technical and non-technical, to world’s biggest problems.
Direction: Parking fees apply. Tickets can be purchased from vending machines located around the campus. The venue is short walk from Redfern station. Free shuttle busses are also available from the Redfern station. For more information please visit: http://sydney.edu.au/current_students/transport_security/parking.shtml
Registration Details: Light refreshments will be served. To assist with catering, please confirm attendance on or before 5:00pm, Friday, 3rd of August. To register please contact Mr. Farhad Hossain:md.hossain@sydney.edu.au
Cost: Free
Fourth Monthly Presentation accompanied with Free Pizza and Soft Drinks
Presenter: Lei Bi (School of IT, Biomedical Imaging group)
Title: An Automated and Robust Lesion Detection Framework for whole body PET-CT studies
Time: 12:30p.m – 1:30p.m Thursday (26th of July 2012)
Venue: Power Engineering Auditorium, Level 2, Next to the PNR building
Abstract: In this talk, I will present a fully automatic approach to identify lesions from whole body PET-CT studies. Multi-atlas registration coupled with local decision fusion function is employed to segment the liver and/or the descending aorta structures. These structures were then used to segment the lesions from PET images. Results of the segmentation with 30 clinical PET-CT studies will be presented and discussed. Finally, I will briefly introduce how we can integrate this approach towards disease classification
Third Monthly Presentation accompanied with Free Pizza and Soft Drinks
Presenter: Hamed Monkaresi
Title: Detecting complex mental states using computer vision techniques
Time: 12:30p.m – 1:30p.m Thursday (28th of June 2012)
Venue: Power Engineering Auditorium, Level 2, Next to the PNR building
Abstract: Most of the existing facial expression recognition (FER) systems focused on posed and basic emotion rather than spontaneous and complex ones. While the ideal context for FER systems is the context which contains spontaneous natural emotion for affect analysis, and includes more than basic emotions which is rarely explored. We proposed a dynamic model which can detect complex mental states during a naturalistic human computer interaction. This system could also detect physiological information such as heart rate variability (HRV) and respiration rate from facial video recording in order to improve the accuracy of user's affect detection.
Second Monthly Presentation accompanied with Free Pizza and Soft Drinks
Presenter: Joshua Spence
Title: Wireless Internet Connectivity for Embedded Devices
Time: 12:30p.m – 1:30p.m Thursday (May,31,2012)
Venue: Power Engineering Auditorium, Level 2, Next to the PNR building
Abstract: I will be discussing the growing market for wireless connectivity for embedded devices, with specific reference to Broadcom's WICED module. This Talk will give an insight into the hardware and software requirements of a low-power, low-memory-footprint wireless module including limitations and performance. A WICED evaluation board will be on demonstration throughout the presentation.
First Monthly Presentation accompanied with Free Pizza and Soft Drinks
Presenter: Shu Ning Bian
Title: Lessons from the trenches: what I learned in the process of creating sensors to measure how fat babies are.
Time: 12:30p.m – 1:30p.m Thursday (26/04/2012)
Venue: Power Engineering Auditorium, Level 2, Next to the PNR building
Abstract: Over the past year and continuing today, I have been working on designing and building sensors to estimate infant body fat. This is a project born out of a request by Prof. Heather Jeffery, and is currently being funded by Bill Melinda Gates Foundation as part of its Grand Challenges in Global Health programme. Over the course of working on this project, I have learned many valuable lessons. I will share these lessons with you so that those who have not yet the opportunity to make the same mistakes for themselves can be forewarned, and those who have made the same mistakes can enjoy an opportunity to amuse themselves at my expense.
Seminar: Crowdsourcing and the expanding modes of computation
Presenter: Prof. David Grier
Title: Lessons from the trenches: what I learned in the process of creating sensors to measure how fat babies are.
Time: 3 pm Monday, 12 March 2012
Venue: The Engineering Conference Room, Room 215, Level 2, Link Building J12
The University of Sydney O-Week
Time: February 29th, 2012
Venue: Lawn outside Old Engineering Library, Next to the PNR building, Darlington Campus
The biggest orientation festival in Australia.
The most high-flying, boredom-defying ways that you can get involved in campus life during your degree at the University of Sydney.
Know more about IEEE and the University of Sydney IEEE student branch
Find out about talks and events,decide which events to attend
Register Online , find out how you can get Free membership
We are waiting for you at Lawn outside Old Engineering Library, Next to the PNR building, Darlington Campus February 29th, 2012
Free IEEE membership
If you are a 3rd, 4th or a post-grad student in 2012, please contact us NOW to get a free IEEE membership.
The number of free student memberships is limited and will be awarded on a first come first serve basis.
You can view the prices and register online at:
http://www.ieee.org/web/me mbership/join/join.html
2011 Student Conference
Sponsored by IEEE NSW section, Faculty of Engineering & Information Technologies Student Conference was successfully held on Monday 31 October in the Eastern Avenue Auditorium.